Walking in an Edo Wonderland, Part 2

Welcome to this week’s post! Last week, we left off right in the middle of the trip I took with my friend to Ouchijuku, an Edo-period village. This week, we’ll resume the tour of this beautiful, snow-covered village!

One thing we decided to do after we’d feasted on mountain vegetable soba was climb up to the overlook behind the village. Although there was a staircase, it was covered with snow, and it was packed hard from all the people who had been going up and down. Luckily, my friend and I both had boots with good tread, so we made it up without any catastrophes. The view overlooking the village was beautiful!

After taking our fill of scenic shots, we made our way back down the slippery steps. We began to walk beyond the village through a snow-covered field to a shrine, but we heard over the loudspeaker that one of the festival events was starting. It was an event I wanted to see, so we turned back and found the crowd of people near the central activity area. I wasn’t sure exactly what the event would be, only that it involved rice cakes (which I’m always eager to be involved with!). It turns out that the festival attendees were dressing a bare tree with colored rice cake balls, or dango. This activity, called dango-sashi, is a traditional event for this time of year, as this site explains: https://fukushima-guide.jp/experience/dango-sashi/. It wasn’t something I wanted to participate in, but it was interesting to watch!

After passing out what must have been hundreds of rice cakes to the festival goers, and encouraging them to keep sticking them onto the tree branches, the people in charge finally decided that the trees were loaded enough to raise. (There were actually two small trees, but it’s hard to see the back one in the picture). With lots of encouragement and interesting sound effects from the announcers, the colorful tree was hoisted into the air:

Against the backdrop of the pale blue sky, it was a pretty sight!

After the dango-sashi, we hung around for a couple more events. There were some students dressed in traditional garb, who performed some interesting dances.  After that was a Shinto dance involving two men under a sheet and a mask. Neither my friend nor I cared to watch that, so instead we wandered around the village some more, enjoying the sights. Around four o’clock, we decided to head out, so we took a very packed bus back to the train station. There, I was able to get some photos of the picturesque area surrounding the station.

Yunokamionsen Station is definitely a quaint little place. According to this site http://www.tif.ne.jp/lang/en/sightseeing/detail.php?id=354&category=1, this station is the only one with a thatched roof in Japan. Inside the minuscule station, there is a waiting area with a wood-burning fireplace, free green tea, and a few shelves of books.

There is even a foot bath right outside!

Our trip to Ouchijuku was fun and refreshing, but our day didn’t stop there! Come back next week to find out where we decided to go afterwards!

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