A Samurai Parade!

Yesterday our generous employers took us to the nearby city of Aizu to watch their annual samurai parade. The event commemorated the Boshin War of the late 1800s, which was a civil war involving a power struggle between the shogun and the emperor. There were lots of people dressed up in period costumes, and some interesting performers as well. I took lots of photos and videos so enjoy the show!

First, an assortment of soldiers, rulers, and even a princess:

There was also a European character, a historical figure from Prussia who sold outdated rifles to the Japanese during the war (the Japanese woman was the family’s nanny):

As we were watching some of the horses that the soldiers rode, one of my teammates said, “I hope they have someone coming behind to clean up the mess.” Sure enough…they did. But these weren’t just any old pooper scoopers, oh no. They were a costumed part of the parade, and they were dressed as, you guessed it….

NINJAS!

At the end of the parade was a teensy tiny (environmentally friendly?) car:

Now, for some videos! (Just a heads-up, the battle scene ends with someone getting “stabbed,” so don’t watch if you’re sensitive to that sort of thing! 🙂 )

After the parade, we went out for lunch, then visited the nearby Tsuruga Castle. Our employer arranged for us to have an English tour, so we got to see the inside. Here are two pictures, one of the exterior and one of the view from the top:


After visiting the castle, we walked back down to the restaurant area and had some ice cream, which appeared to be vanilla but turned out to have a strong milky flavor. Apparently white ice cream doesn’t automatically mean vanilla here? Anyway, we hopped back in the vans for our trip home, with a stop at a bakery so our boss could pick up some fresh bread and rolls. She gave us some of it when we got home, and I got a roll with chunks of sweet potato on it, which was delicious! Japan has a surprising amount of bakery items, and since I LOVE fresh rolls and pastries, that doesn’t hurt my feelings at all. I was pretty wiped out when I got home, but so glad that I got to experience this event and learn more about Japan’s fascinating history!

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