Obon Festival

As promised, here is a post about last week’s Obon Festival! I took lots of pictures and videos, so I’ll let those take center stage. But before we move onto the festival, I just wanted to share another small piece of Japanese summer….CICADAS!! This video doesn’t actually show them – this is just the front of the kindergarten. But you can hear the cicadas buzzing in the trees, and man are they loud over here!

When we learned about the festival, one of my friends and I decided it would be the prime opportunity to dress up in our recently purchased yukata and obi!

Basically, the yukata are made WAY longer than they actually need to be – I’m not sure why, as I think the length of mine would have fit perhaps a 9 or 10-foot giant. In any case, after adjusting the yukata flaps around your torso, you hike up all that extra length, fasten it with a tie around your waist, and smooth the extra material down over the tie. Then you fasten another tie just under your bust. Then you put on the obi (belt). I was inordinately proud of my bow, probably because I never thought I’d actually be able to tie a bow that was presentable (please ignore the fact that it’s a little crooked 🙂 ):

Yep, those long pieces of fabric hanging down are actually part of the sleeves – the sleeves are deep and they come down at right angles, so you can potentially store things in them. OK, now onto the festival…

One of the important activities at an Obon festival is sending lanterns down a river. I think there’s some spiritual significance, such as sending prayers away to dead relatives; in fact I think the whole celebration has something to do with honoring ancestors, which of course I don’t ascribe to (the worshiping part, not the honoring part LOL). For those who are interested in learning more there’s a link to an informative article below. (Upon reading it for myself, I realized that there is the belief that the ancestors’ spirits come back for a visit, and apparently the lantern lighting is a way of sending them back home again.  So much for my knowledge of Japanese culture!)

https://www.tripsavvy.com/japan-obon-festival-1550121

There was a tent beside the river, with LOTS of small lanterns that people kept sending down the river. I was curious about how it works; do people purchase lanterns in the names of their ancestors, or what? I haven’t found out yet. The video below is very short, but shows these lanterns during one of the busy streaks, when there were a lot on the river at a time:

The next video shows some of the launching process.

After awhile, they started sending bigger floats down the river. Since the river was shallow and there were rapids near the footbridge (where we were watching), these floats required some guidance by men who seemed to enjoy frolicking about in the water.

Eventually I moved from the road to a location right beside the river, so I got to see some of the floats – and the rowdy float-guiders – up close. Every time a new float went by, the crowd chanted for the men to “Turn it! Turn it!” Thus the spinning. 🙂

And here is one of my favorite lanterns:

After watching the lantern sailing, we walked to a nearby park for a fireworks show. Due to clouds and smoke, though, it was difficult to see the fireworks, so we gave up partway through and went home.  Fireworks here are pretty much the same as in America, anyway. 🙂 So there we have it – my first Obon festival!

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