The Real Stuff

So, I haven’t done many introspective posts about Japan. Because, really, who wants to read all about my feelings? But as I am creeping up to the two-month mark of my arrival here (it will be a month and a half on May 15th), I thought that I would take a short pause to record what living in a foreign country is REALLY like – that is, what it is like aside from the fun travels and the new experiences. So let’s get started!

OK, number one: what is culture shock like? I think my first perception of culture shock is that it is different for EVERYONE. Everyone has had different experiences to draw from, and a personality that reacts differently to new situations. Supposedly there are four or five different stages of culture shock; I don’t even know which one I’m in. As I live through it, it’s really not that clear cut to me, and I don’t think that it necessarily will be. I still feel a sense of newness and enjoyment of a lot of the things I’m experiencing, which I think would be considered the honeymoon phase. That means some of the harder phases are coming up next (scary thought!), which brings me to the next topic…

Adjusting! It seems like I’m only just now starting to visualize my life here for the next two years. April was chock full of new experiences, meeting new people, and doing lots of traveling. The first week in May was a three-holiday week. Now we’re just starting to settle into a normal routine, and I’m gradually starting to realize that no, I don’t get a three-month break like I would as a teacher in the States, and this is the job that I will be doing for at least the next two years. It actually feels good to settle into a sense of routine, although I’m a bit nervously awaiting the feelings of homesickness and monotony that may creep in as I realize that this IS my life for two years.

Number three: communication. I felt like I knew a “good amount” of Japanese before I came – and I do know a lot of basic vocabulary, sentence structures, and symbols. But it doesn’t lessen the fact that it’s still difficult to actually communicate in Japanese. When people try to hold a conversation with me, I’m able to pick out a few words and sometimes get the gist of what they’re saying. The rest of the time, I just nod and pretend I understand. It’s really frustrating to not understand more, but it’s great motivation to continue learning the language.

Conclusion: Yep, living in a foreign country is fun. But it’s not ALL fun. I embarrass myself a lot, and feel uncertain of myself a lot. I’ve felt unsettled knowing that I’m not near ANY family or close friends anymore (although I have felt hugely supported by my team). But, on the flip side, there are so many good things about being here! I feel braver, more willing to take risks and try new things (or embarrass myself) because, well, that’s just my way of life here. I feel loved and supported by both my team and my family back home. And I feel so, so grateful to be here, because this really has been my dream almost since I was a child. It didn’t necessarily happen in my timing, but it did happen. And I’m so thankful that God led me to this opportunity, at this time. Even if I still have four more stages of culture shock to go… 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *